Japan | Kyoto | Arashiyama

Nijō Castle Kyoto

Japan Winter 2024

Kyoto | Japan

29 Feb 2024 | Thu

Day 10 of 17

  • Nijō Castle Kyoto
  • Train | Kyoto to Osaka
  • Miyako City Osaka Hommachi

Nijō Castle Kyoto

Today was a day of transition as we journeyed from Kyoto to Osaka. We started our day at the Shizutetsu Hotel Prezio Kyoto Shijo, where we decided to check out a bit later than usual. This decision was strategic, as it allowed us to time our arrival at our next destination, Miyako City Osaka Hommachi, to coincide with their 3pm check-in time.

The later check-out also afforded us the opportunity to visit one last gem in Kyoto – the historic Nijō Castle. Just an 18-minute walk away, it was the perfect way to bid farewell to Kyoto.

Entrance to Nijō Castle

As for Nijō Castle, it’s a flatland castle in Kyoto, Japan. The castle consists of two concentric rings of fortifications, the Ninomaru Palace, the ruins of the Honmaru Palace, various support buildings, and several gardens. It was built in 1603 by Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate. The castle’s palace buildings are arguably the best surviving examples of castle palace architecture of Japan’s feudal era. The entire castle grounds and the Honmaru are surrounded by stone walls and moats. It’s one of the seventeen Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which have been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

So, our travel day was filled with a bit of transit, a touch of strategy, and a dash of history, making it a day to remember!

Nijō Castle (二条城, Nijō-jō) is a flatland castle in Kyoto, Japan. The castle consists of two concentric rings (Kuruwa) of fortifications, the Ninomaru Palace, the ruins of the Honmaru Palace, various support buildings and several gardens. The surface area of the castle is 275,000 square metres (27.5 ha; 68 acres), of which 8,000 square metres (86,000 sq ft) is occupied by buildings.

It is one of the seventeen Historic Monuments of Ancient Kyoto which have been designated by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

In 1601, Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate, ordered all the feudal lords in western Japan to contribute to the construction of Nijō Castle, which was completed during the reign of Tokugawa Iemitsu in 1626. While the castle was being built, a portion of land from the partially abandoned Shinsenen Garden (originally part of the imperial palace and located south) was absorbed, and its abundant water was used in the castle gardens and ponds. Parts of Fushimi Castle, such as the main tower and the karamon, were moved here in 1625–26.

Nijo Castle was built as the Kyoto residence of the Tokugawa shōguns. The Tokugawa shogunate used Edo as the capital city, but Kyoto continued to be the home of the Imperial Court. Kyoto Imperial Palace is located north-east of Nijō Castle.

– Nijō Castle Kyoto > Wikipedia

Map | Nijō Castle Kyoto

Leave a Comment